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Caching Server Cache Size

The Caching Service in OS X Sever is great – turn it on, and it largely works just fine. However, I host the cache itself on a Drobo. The Drobo appears as a 16TB volume on the system, so Server.app thinks it’s just a wonderful idea to give me Cache Size slider graduations of 30GB, 1TB, 2TB, etc. That’s not helpful.

Luckily, Apple haven’t obfuscated the configuration for this at all, and I’m not being sarcastic for once. Just go to:

/Library/Sever/Caching/Config/Config.plist

You’ll find the CacheLimit key right there at the top, with an integer value in bytes. Turn off Caching Server, edit, turn Caching Server back on again. Lovely.

Screenshot of Server.app showing the Caching Server config panel.

Okay, so the slider shows the wrong value, but the Usage area gets it right. Now why couldn’t they have just put a box in the UI? Ah, because this is Server.app, not Server Admin.app.

My sarcasm is creeping back!

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SqueezePlay OS for OpenFrame

Latest Release: 19th September 2014 – CHANGELOG

Download SqueezePlay OS v3.00 for External Storage – (219MB) MD5

Download SqueezePlay OS v3.00 for OpenFrame 1 Internal Memory – (218MB) MD5

Download SqueezePlay OS v3.00 for OpenFrame 2 Internal Memory – (219MB) MD5

  • Which version should I download?
  • - If you want to run this from a USB storage device, download the External Storage image.
  • - If you want to run this from internal memory and have an O2 Joggler (or similar) download OpenFrame 1 Internal Memory
  • - If you want to run this from internal memory and have an OpenFrame 2 (front facing speakers) download OpenFrame 2 Internal Memory
  • For either internal storage version, you will need the Reflash System to install it.

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Command Line Wireless Options in OS X

Managing OS X wireless options was a terrible mystery until I discovered the magical hidden ‘airport’ command. If you do any Mac sysadmin work, I recommend:

sudo ln -s /System/Library/PrivateFrameworks/Apple80211.framework/Versions/A/Resources/airport /usr/sbin/airport

This gives you lovely, straightforward access to the airport command, from which you can turn wifi on and off, configure administrative settings; basically everything you need. However, watch out; there’s been a change in the version currently shipping in Mavericks. My fave command was:

sudo airport en1 prefs RequireAdmin=YES

But this will no longer work. Instead you receive this response:

'Unrecognized prefs option 'RequireAdmin=YES'.

It’s not a problem, because Apple have actually unpacked the RequireAdmin option into it’s three constituent parts; RequireAdminIBSS, RequireAdminNetworkChange and RequireAdminPowerToggle. You can now control each of them individually.

So my favourite command has now become:

sudo airport en1 prefs RequireAdminIBSS=YES RequireAdminNetworkChange=YES RequireAdminPowerToggle=YES

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